Advanced Comprehension Therapy

All these activities provide time-tested stimulation of syntax and comprehension. These tasks can be used for assessment to determine where comprehension breaks down, as well as for therapy to bring the user’s attention to their problem and develop strategies for improving performance and skill.

The Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE) and the Psycholinguistic Assessments of Language Processing in Aphasia (PALPA) contain items similar to the exercises in the Identify activity. Complex syntactic structures and pronouns are more difficult for people with aphasia.

The Northwestern Anagram Test (NAT) and the Verb and Sentence Test (VAST) both examine comprehension of sentences using activities similar to the Build activity in this app. It uses a method free from verbal expression to assemble grammatically-correct sentences.

  • Weintraub, S., Mesulam, M. M., Wieneke, C., Rademaker, A., Rogalski, E. J., & Thompson, C. K. (2009). The northwestern anagram test: measuring sentence production in primary progressive aphasia. American journal of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

The Token Test (De Renzi & Vignolo 1962) has activities similar to the Follow activity in this app. Following complex directions is a skill particularly challenging for people with aphasia as every content word must be understood.

Advanced Comprehension Therapy

Advanced Comprehension Therapy

Challenge your understanding with listening and reading exercises for sentences – perfect for mild or moderate aphasia.

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Advanced Language Therapy

Please see the evidence for each individual app:

Advanced Language Therapy

Advanced Language Therapy

Take aphasia therapy to the sentence level & beyond with 4 apps that strengthen listening, talking, reading, & writing.

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Advanced Naming Therapy

The Create activity is based on the Verb Network Strengthening Treatment (VNeST) developed and researched by Dr. Lisa Edmonds. Some modifications have been made to original protocol for this app. Research on the VNeST protocol shows generalization to words beyond those trained in therapy, and a computerized version has shown similar effects.

The Generate activity is a verbal fluency task with both semantic and phonological targets. Norms for the FAS and Animal tests were taken from these published studies:

  • Tombaugh, T. N., Kozak, J., & Rees, L. (1999). Normative data stratified by age and education for two measures of verbal fluency: FAS and animal naming. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology14(2), 167-177.
  • Barry, D., Bates, M. E., & Labouvie, E. (2008). FAS and CFL forms of verbal fluency differ in difficulty: A meta-analytic study. Applied neuropsychology15(2), 97-106.

The Describe activity is a picture description task, a common part of aphasia test batteries. These pictures offer a chance to use many different nouns, adjectives, and verbs. They lend themselves well to Response Elaboration Treatment and barrier tasks for PACE therapy. The unexpected elements in many of these “silly” pictures may provoke more language than typical pictures and requires clearly articulated speech to be understood.

  • Edelman, G. (1987). Promoting Aphasics Communicative Effectiveness: PACE. Winslow Press.

The Compare activity requires category and semantic feature naming. Semantic feature analysis is a well-established aphasia treatment and strategy for word finding. The photo variations call for more adjectives, whereas the abstract categories require high-level vocabulary and synonyms to explain. Each exercise requires a relationship between concepts in the semantic network to be stated.

  • Coelho, C. A., McHugh, R. E., & Boyle, M. (2000). Semantic feature analysis as a treatment for aphasic dysnomia: A replication. Aphasiology14(2), 133-142.
Advanced Naming Therapy

Advanced Naming Therapy

Express yourself better with challenging word-finding exercises for aphasia and cognitive-communication problems.

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Advanced Reading Therapy

These are practice activities that are similar to real-life reading needs. They are graded by reading level and length into 3 levels of difficulty, paired with increasingly difficult questions. The questions give insight into comprehension, memory, and inferencing abilities. The tools available for each passage allow users to listen, get support for individual words, or listen sentence-by-sentence for increased processing time. A self-monitoring prompt after each passage encourages users to monitor their own comprehension with strategies for improving it. All of these parts of the app (highlighting, audio support, self-monitoring, questions, etc) are researched and clinically-useful techniques for improving reading comprehension.

Advanced Reading Therapy

Advanced Reading Therapy

Enjoy reading again with paragraph-level passages to suit all abilities and built-in tools to help you understand text better.

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Advanced Writing Therapy

Advanced Writing Therapy

Advanced Writing Therapy

Strengthen digital communication skills with functional typing, spelling, and composition exercises for adults.

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AlphaTopics AAC

Practical Advice & Evidence Review

Research Reviews

  • Hanson, E. K., Beukelman, D. R., & Yorkston, K. M. (2013). Communication support through multimodal supplementation: A scoping review. Augmentative and Alternative Communication29(4), 310-321.
  • Hanson, E. K., Yorkston, K. M., & Beukelman, D. R. (2004). Speech supplementation techniques for dysarthria: A systematic review. Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology12(2), IX-XXIX. PDF

Published Studies

  • Fercho, K., Baugh, L. A., & Hanson, E. K. (2015). Effects of alphabet-supplemented speech on brain activity of listeners: An fMRI study. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research58(5), 1452-1463. [PDF]
  • Hanson, E. K., Beukelman, D. R., Heidemann, J. K., & Shutts-Johnson, E. (2010). The impact of alphabet supplementation and word prediction on sentence intelligiblity of electronically distorted speech. Speech Communication52(2), 99-105.
  • Tjaden, K. (2008). Speech and swallowing in Parkinson’s disease. Topics in geriatric rehabilitation24(2), 115.
  • Hustad, K. C., & Lee, J. (2008). Changes in speech production associated with alphabet supplementationJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research51(6), 1438-1450.
  • Hustad, K. C., & Garcia, J. M. (2005). Aided and Unaided Speech Supplementation Strategies – Effect of Alphabet Cues and Iconic Hand Gestures on Dysarthric Speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research48(5), 996-1012.
  • Hustad, K. C. (2005). Effects of speech supplementation strategies on intelligibility and listener attitudes for a speaker with mild dysarthria. Augmentative and Alternative Communication21(4), 256-263.
  • Hustad, K. C., & Gearhart, K. J. (2004). Listener attitudes toward individuals with cerebral palsy who use speech supplementation strategies. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology13(2), 168-181.
  • Hustad, K. C., Jones, T., & Dailey, S. (2003). Implementing Speech Supplementation Strategies – Effects on Intelligibility and Speech Rate of Individuals With Chronic Severe Dysarthria. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research46(2), 462-474.
  • Howard, D., & Harding, D. (1998). Self-cueing of word retrieval by a woman with aphasia: Why a letter board works. Aphasiology12(4-5), 399-420.
AlphaTopics AAC

AlphaTopics AAC

Enhance & clarify natural speech with this simple yet powerful augmentative communication app for dysarthria & aphasia.

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Answering Therapy

  • Gray, L., Hoyt, P., Mogil, S., & Lefkowitz, N. (1977). A comparison of clinical tests of yes/no questions in aphasia.
  • Friedmann, N., & Novogrodsky, R. (2011). Which questions are most difficult to understand?: The comprehension of Wh questions in three subtypes of SLI. Lingua121(3), 367-382.
  • Gallagher, T. M., & Guilford, A. M. (1977). Wh-questions: responses by aphasic patients. Cortex13(1), 44-54.
Answering Therapy

Answering Therapy

Give accurate answers when you understand the question using these wh- and yes/no questions.

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Apraxia Therapy

Apraxia Therapy

Apraxia Therapy

Speak more easily and build independence with video-assisted speech therapy to help people with apraxia after a stroke.

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Asking Therapy

  • Kent-Walsh, J., Binger, C., & Buchanan, C. (2015). Teaching Children who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication to Ask Inverted Yes-No Questions Using Aided Modeling. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.
  • Springer, L., Willmes, K., & Haag, E. (1993). Training in the use of wh-questions and prepositions in dialogues: A comparison of two different approaches in aphasia therapy. Aphasiology7(3), 251-270
Asking Therapy

Asking Therapy

Ask yes/no and wh- questions the right way to get the answers you need with these practical language exercises for adults.

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Category Therapy

  • Tyler, L. K., Moss, H. E., Durrant-Peatfield, M. R., Levy, J. P. (2000). Conceptual structure and the structure of concepts: A distributed account of category specific deficits. Brain and Language75 195–231
  • Grossman, M. (1980). The aphasics’ identification of a superordinate’s referents with basic object level and subordinate level terms. Cortex16(3), 459-469.
  • Smith, E. E., Shoben, E. J., Rips, L. J. (1974). Structure and process in semantic memory: A featural model of semantic association. Psychological Review81 214–241
Category Therapy

Category Therapy

Strengthen connections between words with flexible exercises to improve language and reasoning skills.

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Comprehension Therapy

  • Stark, B. C., & Warburton, E. A. (2018). Improved language in chronic aphasia after self-delivered iPad speech therapy. Neuropsychological rehabilitation28(5), 818-831.
  • Knollman-Porter, K., Dietz, A., & Lundeen, K. (2011). Severe Chronic Aphasia: An Intensive Treatment Protocol for Auditory Comprehension. https://aphasiology.pitt.edu/archive/00002276/
  • Marshall, J. C., Pound, C., White-Thompson, M., Pring, T. (1990). The use of picture matching tasks to assist in word retrieval in aphasic patients. Aphasiology4 167–184
Comprehension Therapy

Comprehension Therapy

Understand what you hear and read with word-level exercises you can customize for severe aphasia, autism, or brain injury.

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Conversation Therapy

  • Basso, A. (2010). “Natural” conversation: A treatment for severe aphasia. Aphasiology24(4), 466-479.
  • Boyle, M. (2011). Discourse treatment for word retrieval impairment in aphasia: The story so far. Aphasiology25(11), 1308-1326.
  • Hopper, T., Holland, A., & Rewega, M. (2002). Conversational coaching: Treatment outcomes and future directions. Aphasiology16(7), 745-761.
  • Kempler, D., & Goral, M. (2011). A comparison of drill-and communication-based treatment for aphasia. Aphasiology25(11), 1327-1346.
  • Turner, S., & Whitworth, A. (2006). Conversational partner training programmes in aphasia: A review of key themes and participants’ roles. Aphasiology20(6), 483-510.
Conversation Therapy

Conversation Therapy

Engage in real-life discussions with pictures & questions that get people talking to practice communication strategies.

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Dysphagia Therapy

There are hundreds of selected research references contained in this app specific to each dysphagia therapy technique.

Dysphagia Therapy

Dysphagia Therapy

Treat swallowing disorders better by finding the evidence-based therapy approaches that match your patients’ needs best.

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Language Therapy

  • Stark, B. C., & Warburton, E. A. (2018). Improved language in chronic aphasia after self-delivered iPad speech therapy. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation28(5), 818-831.

Please see the evidence for each individual app:

Language Therapy 4-in-1

Language Therapy 4-in-1

Boost speaking, listening, reading, & writing for words with a scientifically proven speech therapy app for people with aphasia.

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Naming Therapy

  • Stark, B. C., & Warburton, E. A. (2018). Improved language in chronic aphasia after self-delivered iPad speech therapy. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation28(5), 818-831.
  • Boyle, M. (2010). Semantic feature analysis treatment for aphasic word retrieval impairments: What’s in a name? Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 17(6), 411–422.
  • Leonard, C., Rochon, E., & Laird, L. (2008). Treating naming impairments in aphasia: Findings from a phonological components analysis treatment. Aphasiology, 22(9), 923–947.
  • Wambaugh, J. L., Mauszycki, S., & Wright, S. (2014). Semantic feature analysis: Application to confrontation naming of actions in aphasia. Aphasiology, 28(1), 1–24.
  • Wisenburn, B., & Mahoney, K. (2009). A meta-analysis of word-finding treatments for aphasia. Aphasiology, 23(11), 1338–1352.
Naming Therapy

Naming Therapy

Say the right word more easily when you learn the strategies that help you communicate with this popular word-finding app.

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Number Therapy

  • Ablinger, I., Weniger, D., & Willmes, K. (2006). Treating number transcoding difficulties in a chronic aphasic patient. Aphasiology20(1), 37-58.
  • Girelli, L., & Seron, X. (2001). Rehabilitation of number processing and calculation skills. Aphasiology15(7), 695-712.
  • Deloche, G. R., & Seron, X. (1982). From three to 3: A differential analysis of skills in transcoding quantities between patients with Broca’s and Wernicke’s aphasia. Brain105(4), 719-733.
Number Therapy

Number Therapy

Communicate numerical concepts with speaking, listening, reading, and writing exercises.

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Question Therapy

Please see the evidence for each individual app:

Question Therapy 2-in-1

Question Therapy 2-in-1

Combines Asking & Answering Therapy in an app that addresses yes/no & wh- questions for clearer communication.

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Reading Therapy

  • Stark, B. C., & Warburton, E. A. (2018). Improved language in chronic aphasia after self-delivered iPad speech therapy. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation28(5), 818-831.
  • Capitani, E., Laiacona, M., Mahon, B., & Caramazza, A. (2003). What are the facts of semantic category-specific deficits? A critical review of the clinical evidence. Cognitive Neuropsychology20(3-6), 213-261.
  • Druks, J. (2002). Verbs and nouns—a review of the literature. Journal of Neurolinguistics15(3), 289-315.
Reading Therapy

Reading Therapy

Push your reading to the phrase and sentence level with multiple-choice exercises for stroke survivors.

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Spaced Retrieval Therapy

Spaced Retrieval Therapy

Spaced Retrieval Therapy

Make memory training easy using evidence-based expanding intervals with built-in data tracking & timing.

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Speech FlipBook

  • Wambaugh, J. L., Duffy, J. R., McNeil, M. R., Robin, D. A., & Rogers, M. A. (2006). Treatment guidelines for acquired apraxia of speech: Treatment descriptions and recommendations. Journal of Medical Speech Language Pathology14(2), xxxv.
  • Wambaugh, J. L., Martinez, A. L., McNeil, M. R., & Rogers, M. A. (1999). Sound production treatment for apraxia of speech: Overgeneralization and maintenance effects. Aphasiology13(9-11), 821-837.
  • Wambaugh, J. L., Doyle, P. J., Kalinyak, M. M., & West, J. E. (1996). A minimal contrast treatment for apraxia of speech. Clinical Aphasiology24, 97-108.
Speech FlipBook

Speech FlipBook

Flip your way to clearer speech as you generate interactive word lists based on sounds for articulation and apraxia therapy.

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Visual Attention Therapy

Visual Attention Therapy

Visual Attention Therapy

Retrain the brain with interactive cancellation exercises that help you assess and treat left neglect.

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Writing Therapy

  • Stark, B. C., & Warburton, E. A. (2018). Improved language in chronic aphasia after self-delivered iPad speech therapy. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation28(5), 818-831.
  • Coltheart, M., Sartori, G., & Job, R. (Eds.)(2013). The Cognitive Neuropsychology of Language (Psychology Revivals). Psychology Press.
  • Ball, A. L., de Riesthal, M., Breeding, V. E., & Mendoza, D. E. (2011). Modified ACT and CART in severe aphasia. Aphasiology, 25(6-7), 836-848.
  • Beeson, P. M., & Egnor, H. (2006). Combining treatment for written and spoken naming. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 12(06), 816-827.
  • Beeson, P. M., Hirsch, F. M., & Rewega, M. A. (2002). Successful single-word writing treatment: Experimental analyses of four cases. Aphasiology, 16(4-6), 473-491.
  • Robson, J., Marshall, J., Chiat, S., & Pring, T. (2001). Enhancing communication in jargon aphasia: A small group study of writing therapy. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 36(4), 471-488.
Writing Therapy

Writing Therapy

Build independence as you improve your spelling skills with engaging exercises to help you relearn to write single words.

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